The Great Wall of Los Angeles: Judith F. Baca's Experimentations in Collaboration and Concrete

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August 29, 2017

A view of Judy Baca and mural-makers meeting at the 1940’s section of The Great Wall of Los Angeles titled “David Gonzalez” in progress. Photograph courtesy of SPARC Archive. ©1976 Judith F. Baca
 

The Great Wall of Los Angeles: Judith F. Baca's Experimentations in Collaboration and Concrete 

CSU Northridge Art Galleries 

 

This exhibit tells the story of the influential 2,754-foot-long Great Wall of Los Angeles mural in the Tujunga Flood Control Channel and explores the history of Baca's innovation.

The Great Wall of Los Angeles is a 2,754 feet foot-long mural that runs along the concrete wall of the Tujunga Flood Control Channel in the heart of the San Fernando Valley. Conceived by artist Judith F. Baca in 1974, the mural depicts crucial moments in California, from its prehistory until the 1950s. CSUN’s University Galleries will present Experiments in Concrete and Collaboration: Judith F. Baca’s Reconfiguring of The Great Wall of Los Angeles after the Escuela Taller Siqueiros, an exhibition examining the largely unwritten history of Baca’s innovations alongside the methodologies that she developed as a result of her residency at the Escuela Taller Siqueiros, a workshop for muralism founded by the legendary Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros. The exhibition will tell the story of The Great Wall of Los Angeles using preparatory drawings, paintings, photographs, and ephemera, drawn largely from the archives of Baca and the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), which oversees The Great Wall .

 
 
Contact:
Debra Padilla, Executive Director
debra@sparcinla.org, (310) 822-9560 x13